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We are lucky to have some excellent local beaches and be close to an historic river. During the summer months if the sun is shining we can expect our beaches to be busy.  Beautiful and exciting as our coastal waters are, the reality is, they can also be dangerous. 

 

Across the UK there are around 400 accidental deaths each year in and around water, around half of them linked to alcohol.  And between 40 and 50 children drown each year in the UK.  I want more even people to visit our beaches – earlier this year I helped launch Beach Access North East working to make it easier for disabled people to use our beaches.  But I also want people to use our coast safely.

 

There’s no shortage of online advice - from Clive the Coastguard, the Maritime and Coastguards Agency’s Sea Smart Campaign and the RNLI’s Respect the Water Campaign to name but three sources.

 

Later this week I’ll be visiting Swim Safe on Longsands and when Parliament returns I’m due to meet the Royal Life Saving Society to learn more about some of the risks.  I will also be looking carefully at post-Brexit plans to make sure strong environmental protections remain to keep our beaches clean.

 

Let me also say thank you to those who are there when incidents happen, the RNLI with local Tynemouth and Cullercoats crews and the Tynemouth Volunteer Life Brigade who do a fantastic job.

Respect the Water

We are lucky to have some excellent local beaches and be close to an historic river. During the summer months if the sun is shining we can expect our beaches...

House of Commons Standing Orders rarely make for lively reading but bear with me.  SO24 calls for an emergency debate on a specific and urgent matter allowing the Speaker to change the future business.  If the Speaker’s decision is challenged by MP’s, provided 40 stand up in their place the debate goes ahead – a bit of parliamentary pantomime the Commons does so well.  Twice last week the Speaker granted emergency debates, both on the Government’s failure to live up to its undertakings.

My colleague Diana Johnson MP has long campaigned for a public inquiry into how thousands of people were given contaminated blood products in the ‘70’s and ‘80’s.  The Government has ducked and dived on the issue to the frustration of parliament and patients alike.  Given that the Government has starved the Commons of meaningful business to avoid losing any votes the Speaker clearly decided that time could be found for this specific and urgent matter.

The Government then went into a spin unsure of where the debate would lead.  Diana and I agreed that we would call a vote making sure the Government was aware.  The Government sensibly decided the game was up and agreed to a public inquiry.  We now need to make sure it properly addresses the issue including the central role of the Department of Health.  And when Parliament returns the Government needs a proper programme or risk losing further control of business. 

Inquiry into Contaminated Blood

House of Commons Standing Orders rarely make for lively reading but bear with me.  SO24 calls for an emergency debate on a specific and urgent matter allowing the Speaker to...

Last week was The Climate Change Coalition’s Week of Action.  I joined supporters at the start of their guided tour of Cullercoats where friends and allies could discuss their concerns about climate change.  The Coalition includes agencies like CAFOD, the official aid agency of the Catholic Church.  They work to prevent climate change pushing people deeper into poverty and to promote the transition to sustainable energy.  The Coalition’s aim is to reaffirm Britain's role as a global climate leader and specifically to ensure all government departments work together to produce an ambitious emissions reduction programme that will meet the Climate Change Act targets.  They believe that the advent of a new government is the opportunity to refresh the UK's commitment to tackling climate change.  In case this seems a highbrow complex science matter about far off places of which we know little, think again.  It's also about unlocking the potential of local and community produced energy.  It's about making our homes more energy efficient keeping us warmer and healthier.  And it's about cutting vehicle emissions which keeps our streets cleaner and healthier.  The challenge is great not least because the President of the world's leading power doesn't believe in Climate Change while at the same time the UK is seeking to exit the organisation which has helped guarantee higher environmental standards.  But the longest walk begins with the first small step so good luck to local Climate Change Coalition supporters.

Climate Coalition Week of Action

Last week was The Climate Change Coalition’s Week of Action.  I joined supporters at the start of their guided tour of Cullercoats where friends and allies could discuss their concerns...

In my 20 years in Parliament I cannot remember a more uncertain time.  The parliamentary arithmetic required that the Conservatives sought a deal with the DUP to stay in office.  Pursuing the DUP risks unsettling the peace process which demands British government impartiality.  The deal was underpinned with £1 billion to aid development in Northern Ireland.  If that’s the case then regions like ours also deserve a share.  Why is it right that austerity has ended for the people of Newcastle County Down but not for the people of Newcastle Tyne and Wear? 

Although the Queens Speech eventually went ahead it was a shadow of the one expected.  The decision not to have a Queens Speech next year and a two year session looks like a desire to avoid parliamentary scrutiny.  And all this with a Prime Minister whose flawed judgement in calling an unnecessary election has put a question mark against her own position. 

The context could hardly be worse.  The formal Brexit process began with the Government having few cards to play and a long game in prospect. So the fishermen I met in Westminster this week to discuss fishing after the Common Fisheries Policy are right to be nervous that the Government’s position is already in retreat.  As the tempo of visits and summer events grows in my constituency people are talking about politics and the need for leadership.  It’s going to be long summer.

Uncertain times ahead

In my 20 years in Parliament I cannot remember a more uncertain time.  The parliamentary arithmetic required that the Conservatives sought a deal with the DUP to stay in office. ...

My last constituency event before the Commons returns after recess was presenting awards to the winners of the 10K Road Race.  Thousands of runners took part in what must be one of the most picturesque races. How many road races pass a castle, a priory, a working fish quay, great beaches and finish at a lighthouse? The coast has been particularly busy in the last few weeks, signs of growing evidence that regeneration is taking shape.

 

About time some would say.  Until twenty years ago in true British fashion, the economic decline in seaside towns, as holiday makers chose warmer destinations, was basically ignored.

 

The incoming Government had to be persuaded that investment was needed, hence Labour’s Sea Change programme, followed, to this Government's credit, by the Coastal Communities Fund.  Government action alone was never likely to be enough which is why regeneration has been a partnership between the local authority, local communities and businesses.

 

It has also had to be regeneration for everyone, visitors and residents alike, including residents of other parts of the borough.  It's a job not yet complete – for example, a few weeks ago I lobbied Minister on behalf of Friends of Tynemouth Outdoor Pool to ensure funding was still there to bid for. But I genuinely believe there is a growing confidence judging by the number of local people and groups, getting involved and the quality of much of the investment.

 

Regeneration on track

My last constituency event before the Commons returns after recess was presenting awards to the winners of the 10K Road Race.  Thousands of runners took part in what must be...

Last weekend I joined dozens of volunteers on a clean up of Longsands organised by Surfers Against Sewage. We've got some great award winning beaches. In the last few years our beaches have won blue flag awards, Trip Advisor has given Longsands an "Award for Excellence" and last year Rough Guides said Tynemouth was the best seaside town in Britain. But however clean the beaches and bathing waters are there was still work to be done particularly to highlight the problem of plastics in our seas and along our shores.

 

Inevitably the conversation shifted to Brexit and what it means for our coastal communities and the environment in general. Earlier that week in Westminster the Prime Minister had triggered Article 50 to start the process of negotiating our exit from the EU. The improvement of bathing water and higher environmental standards have coincided with our membership of the EU. They are crucial to the ongoing coastal regeneration which is improving the coast for residents and visitors alike.

 

The Government says the Great Repeal Bill will incorporate EU regulation into our domestic law and then allow the UK to decide which bits to keep. We have laid down six tests for any Brexit deal including maintaining environmental standards and where possible improving them. The hundreds of people using Longsands last weekend, the dozens of volunteers and the businesses and community groups who have bought into regeneration demand nothing less.

 

Environmental standards must be maintained

Last weekend I joined dozens of volunteers on a clean up of Longsands organised by Surfers Against Sewage. We've got some great award winning beaches. In the last few years...

Every parent wants the best start in life for their child which is why schools are so important.  In North Tyneside 95% of children attend a Good or Outstanding school, a higher proportion than any local authority outside London.  That success is due to the work of students and staff but also support from parents and the local authority.  There's growing concern however that cuts to school funding will leave schools struggling for resources.  Spending per pupil in North Tyneside is already projected to be £1500 less than the average London borough by 2017-18, showing where Government priorities lie.  But further changes to the National Fair Funding Formula are set to take a further 2.7% from school budgets, that's before schools have to pay the cost of pay rises, pensions and NIC changes.  For schools with big sixth forms it's worse, as they struggle to cope with cuts to Post 16 funding.  The cuts will mean fewer staff, less buildings maintenance or a reduced curriculum or most likely all of them.  North East Schools would need £323 million to match London levels yet the Chancellor set aside £360 million for unnecessary grammar or free schools.  I've already raised my concerns with Ministers and will be meeting local Headteachers to see what more can be done.  The Government U turned over changes to National Insurance and they need to do so again before our children's futures are damaged.

Worries over Government cuts to school budgets

Every parent wants the best start in life for their child which is why schools are so important.  In North Tyneside 95% of children attend a Good or Outstanding school,...

This week’s highlight in Parliament is the Chancellor’s Spring Budget.  The Budget is actually a statement in which the Chancellor of the Exchequer sets out the state of the nation’s finances and his plans for the year to come.  As with all big parliamentary occasions there’s an element of tradition whether it’s the Treasury team photo on the steps of Number 11 or the use of Gladstone’s original Ministerial Red Box.

The statement is longer than is typical and the response is made by the Leader of the Opposition, in what is probably the hardest task in parliament.  The ministerial rules demand all statements are given to the Opposition before delivery but in my experience the Budget statement is often delayed and when it comes it’s redacted, making a response even tougher.  It does help however that traditionally neither the Chancellor of the Exchequer nor Opposition Leader are intervened on.

This year’s Budget will be a tricky balancing act of controlling rising debts to satisfy the markets but also prepare for an economy post Brexit.  As ever it’s about priorities, whether inheritance tax should be cut, which would have only a marginal effect on my constituency, or invest more to tackle the crisis in the NHS and social care.  But the real test is how Wednesday’s statement will seem after the weekend and whether or not households, after years of being squeezed, feel better able to cope.

Budget 2017

This week’s highlight in Parliament is the Chancellor’s Spring Budget.  The Budget is actually a statement in which the Chancellor of the Exchequer sets out the state of the nation’s...

Small businesses are the backbone of our economy yet in a few weeks’ time many face eye watering increases in their business rates.  Shifting property values made a revaluation of non domestic properties - business rates - necessary but two years ago, on the eve of a General Election, that was postponed.  From April 1st 2017, however, many businesses will see the impact.  Some revaluations seem perverse, for example stables and riding schools will see significant rises. Elsewhere it's on our high streets that the effect may be most felt. There are transition arrangements - but less generous than previously. There's a new appeal system but with the purpose of reducing the number of challenges.

 

The outcome is likely to be greater uncertainty for town centres at a time when, for example, in Whitley Bay the proposed closure of the Job Centre threatens to take services out of the town. There is however a further worrying aspect to business rate revaluation.  With London property prices, and therefore rates, rising faster, London and the South East are likely to pay around 32% of all business rates across the country. Pressure is growing for those areas to keep all their business rates rather than pool them for national redistribution. Areas like North Tyneside would lose more than £20 million, adding to the existing regional imbalance. It's time for an overhaul of the system before it's too late for our vital small businesses.

Business Rate Revaluation

Small businesses are the backbone of our economy yet in a few weeks’ time many face eye watering increases in their business rates.  Shifting property values made a revaluation of...

Some issues coming before Parliament are of such importance that they take on an historic significance. And so it was this week when The European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill – triggering Article 50 to you and I – was being debated.

 

I voted to Remain, I campaigned to Remain. I wish the Referendum outcome had been different, but it wasn’t.  I respect the result just as I would have expected a different result to be respected.  We need to know what a Brexit deal might look like and the European Union have clearly said that substantive discussions can only happen once Article 50 has been triggered.

 

We argued that the Government should bring forward a White Paper setting out its position and a vote for Parliament on any deal before it is concluded. The Government was forced to concede on both points.  Parliament must also have a role in ensuring any Brexit deal focuses on the economy and jobs, rights at work and environmental protections.

 

Feelings run high on both sides. For some MP’s the referendum result in their area was clear cut, one way or another. In North Tyneside the result was much closer, and in Tynemouth closer still.

 

However, the decision to trigger Article 50 was not made this week, it was made on June 23rd 2016 by the British people.  Now the work starts in getting the best deal for everyone regardless of how they voted.

Working for the best Brexit

Some issues coming before Parliament are of such importance that they take on an historic significance. And so it was this week when The European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill...

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